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The Bill Fleischman internship

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Stipends to support editing and sports writing

The Bill Fleischman stipend of $1,000, given through gifts to The Journalism Program in his name, is given to a student doing an internship in sports writing or copy editing.

Interested students should email a resume and cover letter, attaching or linking to relevant clips, to the internship director at journalism@udel.edu.

Students are encouraged to apply as early as possible, but no later than the first week in May.

'Always ready with sage advice and a steadying hand'
Bill Fleischman teaching

​Even after he retired from UD, Bill Fleischman  kept on teaching, often giving guest lessons in copy editing, as he does here in 2016.

​For much of his career, Bill Fleischman led a double life.

One life was as a journalist, beginning with the Burlington County (N.J.) Times and Delaware's News Journal. In 1969, Fleischman moved to the Philadelphia Daily News as a sports writer and editor. He developed an expertise in hockey and auto racing, resulting in two books:  “Bernie, Bernie”, a biography of Flyers goaltender Bernie Parent, written with Sonny Schwartz, and “The Unauthorized NASCAR Fan Guide.” written with Al Pearce.

Fleischman covered the Flyers when the team won its only Stanley Cups, in 1974 and ’75. He'll happily point out that the Flyers haven’t won since, "so I’m saying I had something to do with those championships."

Bill Fleischman

​Bill Fleischman

​Fleischman, who eventually became assistant sports editor of the Daily News, was so well-known that his autograph joined the wall of celebrities at Wilmington's DiNardo's Restaurant.

But one day in 1981, he was approached by Shaun Mullin, a UD alumnus and a Daily News desk editor, who knew that the school was looking for someone to teach editing and newspaper design.

Fleischman's second life was about to begin.

In his teaching career, Fleischman was able to give students lessons that were based on his first-hand experiences. One such example was in that 1993 Review story:

After winning the first three playoff games in 1975  against the New York Islanders, the Flyers found themselves in a tie.

"I began comparing the Flyers to the 1964 Philadelphia Phillies. The '64 Phillies are possibly the biggest choke in baseball history," he said.

"The owner of the Flyers, Ed Snider, was not happy with my comparison. I was interviewing players after the game and felt a jab in my back, and I heard Snider shrieking, '64 Phillies my ass!'

"I tried to ignore him, but when I turned to face him, Snider had his right arm cocked and ready to strike me."

As he told the story, he raised his own arm to re-enact the moment. But Snider's blow never came; he was pulled away before he could strike.

"Snider was excided over the game and the post-win celebration," Fleischman said, adding that later that night Snider hugged him and apologized.

Fleischman told the Review reporter that he worried young sportswriters were writing dull stories, "lacking sparkle," possibly caused by watching too much TV.

His call for better writing was heard by his students. Sharon O'Neal, in a 1990 Review column before she  took over as editor in chief, wrote that she wanted "to produce what will be one of the most hell-raising papers this university has seen ...

"But, as Bill Fleischman said, it will be well thought out, well written hell."

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The Bill Fleischman internship
  • The Journalism Program
  • 207 Memorial Hall
  • University of Delaware
  • Newark, DE 19716, USA
  • 302-831-3870
  • journalism@udel.edu